Radical Doula Profiles: Cara Del Favero

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Cara: Full spectrum (certified) birth doula, OSHA Certified placenta encapsulation specialist, childbirth educator, Certified Lactation Counselor and Certified Postpartum Doula. Serving the Albany, NY and Capital Region areas. Visit http://thealbanydoula.com or call (518)542-5475 for more information.

What inspired you to become a doula?
I identify as VERY pro-choice in my political views, however once I became pregnant, I realized that I also found the idea that pregnant people deserved the right to their own bodily autonomy during childbirth to be integral.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
I identify as queer when it comes to my personal life, which allows me to gain a wider understanding of the specific needs that people have in the birth community. I have done plenty of research and reading to educate myself on the notion of white privilege and being a “placeholder” for those from marginalized groups. I acknowledge my privilege and work hard to help support the community in making new connections and changing traditional belief systems that may be harmful to some families.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
My favorite thing about being a doula, which took me a long time to figure out, is knowing just how NOT about me childbirth is. I realized that birth is an intimate and very personal situation for all families and I learned just how important it is to meet people where they’re at and not where I would “want” them to be. My choices may not be yours and I completely love and respect that.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?
If I could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, I would let all birthing people know that they have options. I would make sure that they have all the resources available to them to learn about the choices they have available to them without having to face social or economic barriers to this information.

Radical Doula Profiles: Anna Berger

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Anna: I’m a DONA International-certified birth doula and CAnna outside, wearing jeans and a black jacketAPPA-trained prenatal educator working in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. I holds a BA in political theory from Northern Illinois University and a Master’s in Library Science focused on community information resources for youth and families from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

As a doula, I dedicate my practice to assisting families as they prepare for their birth via education and emotional support, offering evidence-based information throughout the planning process and helping to explain the various changes and concerns many families face during the birthing year. In addition to my own support in pregnancy, labour, and the early postpartum period, I strive to help families find ways to connect with their communities for support and companionship as they enter a new stage of their lives.

For more information or to get in touch, you can find me at www.midtowndoula.ca.

What inspired you to become a doula?
The combination of my education background, professional experience in undergraduate student affairs, education, and community library services, and the process of immigrating to Canada in 2011, I came to realize how difficult it can be to transition into a new life in a culture where our local community connections have taken such a hit, and I began working toward becoming a resource for members of my community who might find themselves disconnected or lacking in support. I quickly found that new parents and young families, especially those who come to this tremendously diverse city from other parts of the country and around the world, are among those who most struggle to find connection and the tools they need to find and engage with others who share their stories.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
In a way, I think most doulas are a bit radical–we are working hard on a movement toward a colossal change in the way our culture approaches birth, moving from the expectation that pregnant people will take directions toward the expectation that they will make choices for themselves that must be respected and informed.

Additionally, however, I am pro-choice and strive for an inclusive practice that is welcoming and embracing of diverse families and experiences. As a member of the LGBTQ community, I know how difficult it can be to find providers and support people who do more than pay lip service to inclusive work. I do everything I can to make sure not only my practice but the resources I share and the referrals I offer are the most inclusive I can find.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?
My philosophy as a doula is that every family should have support for their reproductive choices, regardless of what they might be, and it really ends there. I strive to be a source of reliable, balanced information and support, whom people can approach without fear of judgment or discomfort, and do everything I can to be someone you can trust to help you follow through on individual decisions once you’ve made them.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
In the grand scheme, I love being the link between people. When I can connect someone with another person and know they’ll find the support they need in one another, I know I’ve done my job well and met my personal and professional goals.

In a more specific sense, I absolutely love seeing the sun rise after an overnight labour, whether it’s the first sunrise we’ve shared or the second. I’ve seen them in all seasons and from many different parts of my city, and it feels powerful and magical every time. I’ve always loved mornings, but my appreciation for them has grown immensely since I started this work.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?
I would love to see a cultural shift in the way pregnancy information is presented. Although I know most of the information sources need to be approachable enough for a wide range of educational backgrounds, I wish more of our resources shared the information to help families make informed decisions rather than simply telling them what will happen at various stages in the pregnancy and birth process. It’s sometimes a subtle difference, but I think it’s so, so important.

I would also like to see a greater focus on informed choice (which to me implies a fairly even balance between the right to consent and the right to refuse) and informed consent (which makes informed refusal feel heavily discouraged). Again a sometimes subtle difference in terms of outcomes, but not such a subtle difference in approach.

Radical Doula Profiles: Joey Larson

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

Picture of Joey Larson holding a newbornAbout Joey: Birth has become a passion in my life, the rights for woman and how she is treated before, during, and after birth should make her feel no less than honored and treasured. My mom taught me compassion, choice, love and support are so important in a woman’s life..and behold a doula was born…The idea of birth makes me cry and the truth is it is a true MIRACLE. Working with my many types of families and situations has opened my eyes and appreciation to different cultures and customs of birth. I am in awe how birth changes yet stays the same all over the world. It truly is a universal miracle. I live in Minnesota. Contact: birthingmiracles.yolasite.com or birthingmiracles.jl@gmail.com.

What inspired you to become a doula?
I was so lucky to be chosen by God to be birthed in to a family with a mother who loved the miracle of what birth was..I always worked and loved the babies and mama’s..My mom taught me compassion, choice, love and support are so important in a woman’s life..and behold a doula was born…The idea of birth makes me cry and the truth is it is a true MIRACLE.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
I believe a woman should have rights, rights to her body during pregnancy. She should choose when and where she births. A woman should have the right to decide what she puts in her body and her babies body during and after birth. A woman should not have a stereotype because of how she births or what she chooses in the birthing process. Birth is a miracle and should be treated no less than of which it truly is.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?
My doula philosophy is a woman should have the birth she chooses. She should have many choices. I believe that to have a great birth you need to treasure a woman in all areas, like emotional, physical and spiritual. To teach her to advocate and give her a voice. I also let women know they can interview, fire, and change at any point in their birth.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
I would say my favorite thing is watching the transformation from a woman to a mother and when a partner’s face changes when they see the picture of LOVE in their new baby or babies. I love holding a space and having a women feel treasured. I also think a great birth is the partner feeling empowered and supported as well.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?
CHOICES.. lots and less judgement.

Radical Doula Profiles: Nikki

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

Nikki smiling with long hair

About Nikki: My name is Nikki and I’m brand new to the doula game! I’m training as a birth doula and serve Warren (PA), Erie (PA), and Chautauqua (NY) counties. I became a doula for a plethora of reasons. I’ve always been an activist for women’s rights. I’ve known too many women walk into the hospital planning to breastfeed, to have a natural birth, to avoid a cesarean, only to walk out with a bottle fed baby that, while beautiful and magnificent, was not given the chance at the birth both mom and baby deserved. No one should fear birth. We’ve been doing it for eons. I want to welcome babies into the world. I want to see them take their first breath and have their mother, alert and overjoyed, gaze into that babies eyes and know that this is her world now. I don’t want anyone to suffer the misery of not getting the experience they deserve.

Out of all of this, I was inspired to search for a way to help. I created Birth Essentials Doula Services as a way to spread the love the mothers and babies. Helping women who may otherwise not be able to afford a doula or even know what a doula is! You can find Birth Essentials at facebook.com/pabirthessentials, on twitter @BE_Doula, or our website.

What inspired you to become a doula?

Years ago, I became enamored with the birth process, I considered the life of a doula, but that it was far-fetched and impossible. Fast forward to more recent times. I suffered a devastating miscarriage of my first pregnancy, at first I wanted only to wallow in my sadness, but, for the sake of my lost child, I knew I had to do something better. I discovered Intuitive Childbirth, the program through which I am certifying. I knew that this was something I had to do. I needed to ensure that, although my family did not expand the way we expected, other women were not stripped of their choices and their autonomy. I never want anyone to feel so helpless, whether in the midst of a loss or on what should be the most joyous occasion they will ever experience. Every birth, every mother, and every baby is precious, unique, and deserves the best.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

To be a radical doula, to me, means to never stop pushing (no pun intended). No matter where we’re practicing, who we’re working with, or what kind of obstacles might get in our way, a good doula takes care of her clients. She supports her community and educates women who need her. She doesn’t turn away a client because of a lack of funds, she stays up all day and night, sacrificing her own time to ensure that every woman that needs her can have her at their side.

I believe that I am destined to be a radical doula.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?

Trust.

Trust your body, trust your instincts, trust yourself.

Nobody knows what’s better for you than you do. You may need some assistance along the way. Sometimes it may feel like you’re never going to make it out alive. That’s where people like myself come in. That’s why there are midwives and OBs and doula’s to help you through every part of this experience. More than anything, you need encouragement. Nobody should ever make you feel inadequate. Ina May has said it and I believe it is true. Your body is NOT a lemon.

My whole philosophy on life, in all venues, is about trusting yourself. Doing what’s best for you without stepping on too many toes. Do You.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?

I love being an advocate. I love empowering women. I love that I can be a source of support in what can be a beautiful, yet very difficult time. Being a doula is about support and love. That’s all I want from this.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?

Obstetricians are for complicated pregnancy! Midwives are for the majority of women who are perfectly capable of giving birth on their own terms!

The United States has this so backwards! Birth is not scary or inherently dangerous. Why is it okay to show an inaccurate, TERRIFYING scene of a cesarean birth on tv, but not a natural, loving, peaceful birth? Women need exposure to the truth. They need more women like us Radical Doulas to show them the way.

We are not broken, pregnancy is not an illness. We can’t afford to believe these falsehoods anymore.

Radical Doula Profiles: Lisa Artis

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

Lisa lying down with braids

About Lisa: I am originally from Washington D.C. and I have two beautiful daughters who are my world and were truly my first teachers regarding the magic of birth. I’ve worked with families in the D.C. area as well as in Tallahassee, Florida and South Florida where my girls were born. I have met and connected with some astounding doulas and families in the state of Michigan as well, where home birth is on the rise. I hope to connect with many more women and families in South Florida, especially those who desire home birth and to birth in non-traditional settings.

I like to think that my experience has and will continue to inspire birthing women. I have been pregnant four times; my first child was born via a c section due to fetal distress. After that experience, I knew I wanted things to be different the second time around and they were! I had my second daughter at home and it was a most memorable experience. Vbac rocks!!

I have two “spirit” babies; one who was born in 2006 (a miscarriage) and one who was born in 2009 (a stillbirth). All of my “births” tell my story as a mother, a doula and a strong woman who has seen and literally experienced birth in all of its glory and pain. I am a doula who “knows” the winds of change when it comes to birth and who will be there through it all. I love and support this beautiful journey and I hope to one day become a midwife.

What inspired you to become a doula?

I believe my inspiration to become a doula has been within me since I was a child! I have always loved new babies, the beautiful energy that exudes from a pregnant woman and being present in their lives. Before I knew there was a name for women who assist pregnant and birthing women, I made it my business to be there for my friends who had just given birth. A close girlfriend of mine was my doula during the birth of my second child and it was then that I knew I wanted to inquire further about becoming a doula myself.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

I identify with the term “radical doula” with an innate knowing that since this is my calling; I must be radical about what I am doing; sharing with other women, supporting them through their own personal journey and knowing that my work is a reflection of how much I love being in the midst of birth and the postpartum period.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?

My doula philosophy is to love and support mothers from all walks of life; there are no boundaries for me when it comes to being a doula. When I am asked to join a woman at her birth or afterward; I see a new mother who I have been honored to accompany and I take this position of nurturing her seriously from day one.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?

My favorite thing about being a doula is the connections that I make with mothers and families. Looking in a mama’s eyes as I hold her hands and encourage her during labor is priceless. I have never left a birth without shedding tears of joy; watching intently as baby makes his or her way into the world; it’s a spiritual experience for me; always. Watching mama and baby connect for the first time is so energizing to me; it’s truly unforgettable.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?

I would most definitely have more positive images of birth in the media instead of what we are typically fed. Birthing women cry, growl, laugh, and some even experience orgasm! They are all not strapped to beds screaming for drugs and wishing they could be doing anything other than giving birth.

Radical Doula Profiles: Simone Snyder

Simone smiling with long earrings

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Simone: I started working as a doula and childbirth educator in Santa Fe, NM and I am now living and working back in New Jersey. I am also a massage therapist, placenta specialist, and Dancing for Birth instructor. I have two amazing boys. One was born in a hospital in NJ and the other was born at home in NM. Two very, very different experiences. In addition to my birthwork I am also a Dating Abuse Prevention Educator. I work with a doula partner and we can be contacted through our website www.douanj.com. One day I will also be a midwife.

What inspired you to become a doula?

I was inspired by doula work a few years before I ever found out I was pregnant. When I began my pregnancy journey I hired a doula before I found a doctor or told anyone I was pregnant! There was just something about the idea of being able to support and empower women that was appealing. I had NO idea it would lead me to where I am today. My hospital birth experience was less then ideal to say the least. I didn’t realize just how traumatizing it was until I had experienced a homebirth. It took me a few years after my first son was born to actually start working as a doula but it has been full steam ahead since then, it has been about six years since I attended my first birth. I eat, sleep, and breathe maternal and child health.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

I think I identified with the word radical all of my life. I have always had this radical spirit-the kind of spirit that gets other people to say “oh boy there she goes again.” I just can’t help it-I see something that is important to me and that is it. For so long I felt like I had to walk this fine line. Many doula trainings out there teach you to be the opposite of radical, to be as middle ground as you can possibly be. I realized that is not me. The concept of putting what I associate with the word radical and what I associated with the word doula together was a huge eye opener. The term radical doula helped me to realize I could put all that I am passionate about together, to begin to work all along the spectrum. I think it also offers the ability to connect your political beliefs to the work you love. I have never been given the freedom to do that before.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?

It is all about the same thing…

It is about choice. It is about education. It is about information. It is about equality. It is about empowerment. And it is about the truth and not believing everything you are told. It is about asking questions.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?

Watching a woman really come in to her own power throughout the process. The earlier we get to work with mamas the better. Knowing that what she did was amazing, and knowing that she could do it all by herself. Knowing that her body knew how to grow, birth and feed a baby. Watching that sense of trust and faith unfold. Then being able to watch that carry over into parenting-it is priceless!

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?

FEAR! The fear women are fed on a daily basis. If we could get rid of that fear I think things would be vastly different then they are now.

Radical Doula Profiles: Alexandrea Finney

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

Alexandrea smiling wearing yellow headbandAbout Alexandrea Finney: Hanging out in the far west suburbs of Chicago, Saint Charles Illinois to be exact, I’m a slightly obsessed chicken keeper, garden grower, wanna-be-foodie picture taker, mother of one incredible ASD diagnosed kiddo, and lover of this messy journey called life. I hang out online at www.facebook.com/alexandreafinney. Drop in and say hi, I’d love to meet you!

What inspired you to become a doula?

My journey to being a doula has found me kicking and resisting most of the way. I still have a hard time defining myself as a doula because regular on-call birth assistance does not fit in my current lifestyle and that seems to be the classical definition of “doula”. The call to support women, however, to travel with them and to stand at the end of the bridges when they travel alone, has been irresistible in my life.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

When I first heard the term “radical doula” I thought, “Yes! That’s it!”. While birth is one of the “deepest drinks” many women take in life, I can’t separate it from pregnancy, fertility, menses, loss, abortion, sexuality, menopause . . . life. For me, my doula work involves late night calls to mamas far away while my daughter sleeps, long Facebook chats where we knit together community with women who don’t have it locally, coffee shop get togethers about fertility planning, and hand holding through deep, deep grief. I hope at some point my work does involve grabbing a bag and running out the door to attend a birth, but it includes a lot more than that too.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?

I believe that through shaming and ignorance, we have lost a valuable understanding of ourselves as women. I believe that regaining the knowledge and the mystery of our bodies changes us and changes the world.

As a queer mama I have seen how shame and marginalization of the LGBT community has torn away our confidence in our bodies and its abilities. Gender queer and transexual men and women have almost no recognition or support in the birthing community. I politically support and fight for the right to fully show up in the world. Wrapping my arms around my community, finding resources and educating, and taking back full ownership of our reproductive, sexual selves is an act of political activism for me.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?

My favorite thing is watching women evolve, “being with” as they come into a fuller actualization of who they are. I’ll never get tired of watching that happen.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?

I would hold up a mirror that would show every pregnant and birthing human being their own deity, the breathtakingly beautiful person they are.

Radical Doula Profiles: Karly Santiago

Photo of Karly with glasses and scarfThis is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Karly Santiago: I am a birth doula based in Long Beach, CA. I started out my earlier career wanting to be a make up artist but my life had another calling! I have an amazing man that I call mine and two little girls that are the epitome of rascals! I believe in informed choices, loving support, and a hand to hold. Your birth experience matters! You can find me on the web: www.picklesandicecreamdoula.com on Facebook: www.facebook.com/picklesandicecreamdoula or on Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/doulakarly

What inspired you to become a doula?

The birth of my second daughter really changed my perspective on giving birth. I felt like I could conquer the world after that experience. I wanted other women to feel the way I did. No matter what their birthing choices, everyone should be treated with respect and allowed to make their own choices for their body.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

I identify with being a radical doula because I believe information is power! We need to take back our bodies and experiences. Women should have every right to informed consent, letting their bodies labor naturally, and choices when it comes to their baby. Wouldn’t it be radical if every woman had the support and respect she deserves?!

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?

My absolute favorite thing is being able to witness the moment that a woman becomes a mother and a man becomes a father. It doesn’t matter if its the first time or the 5th time, the moment is pure magic! The surprise and love that is all over their face the first time they lay eyes on their sweet babe is like no other. I count it a privilege to be in that moment with them.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?

I would want to change the way that others speak to pregnant women. The negativity and horror stories are not helping to further the amazing thing that is birthing a baby. We have to realize that just because one woman had an unfortunate experience, doesn’t make that the norm. We need to grow and learn from our past, but not dwell there. Instead of scaring a pregnant woman, why not tell her what you learned from your experience? It might help the both of you grow and build a bond that we should have as women. Sisterhood is a powerful tool, especially when we rally around a pregnant mama!

Radical Doula Profiles: Latrice Hankerson

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Latrice: I am a mother of 3 expecting my 4th child in December. We live in Boynton Beach. I aspire to travel long term very soon with my family. I am very critical of the status quo. I seek to find the truth and inform and inspire people through education. I aspire to be a published writer in the next 3 years. I also am very passionate about helping mothers help other mothers, and would love to be the UN Ambassador of Maternal Health one day!

What inspired you to become a doula?

I became a doula because I believe in women. I believe in mothers and I firmly believe that the only way to strengthen goodness in the world is to support, uplift and inspire mothers. Mothers represent the me, the future of our planet.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

I identify with that term because I have recently made the connection between the disempowerment of women during the birth process and accordingly in life. Women have been sold the story that we are passive participants in our births and that is NOT the way it should be. I believe that the decline in midwifery is directly correlated to war and violence in the world. I believe in radical change in the way we look at, speak of and treat birth. I am strongly interested in Africa as a region for the upliftment of birthing mothers. Africa represents to me ground zero of humanity and ironically, ground zero of the worst places on the planet to birth. Sad but true.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?

My philosophy is that the more women know, the more empowered they are to ask questions and hold health care providers accountable. Women will be the catalyst for changing birth from a capitalist venture to a sacred experience worthy of respect.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?

It is like meeting God. Attending birth is a divine gift. Fragile and powerful, urgent and timely. Birth is magical.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?

It would be that women are afraid. Afraid and fractured from an experience that should be life alteringly beautiful and unforgettable. No woman should ever have to birth alone or fearfully. That is changeable. NOW.

 

Radical Doula Profiles: Kira Kim

Kira Kim smiling with red lipstick

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Kira Kim: I am Mama to two awesome kids who are 3 and 1 and I live on the North Shore about 20 miles north of Boston. I am a labor doula, lactation educator and placenta encapsulation specialist. I am also a student midwife through the Massachusetts Midwives Alliance and loving every minute. Society likes to put us in boxes. I hate it and break out constantly. But if I had to be put in boxes, these would be them and of these I’m the most proud: I’m a wife, a Mama, an existentialist. A doula, a lactation educator and a student midwife. A biology nerd, lover of placentas, and an extroverted introvert. A cellist, an open-minded individual and an all around hypocritical oxymoron. Find Kira on the web, on facebook, or via email: kira@northshorebirthservices.com.

What inspired you to become a doula?

My first birth was traumatic in so many ways. I was uninformed going into it and didn’t have a strong support system. I was bullied by staff and since I had no knowledge that could cement me to the floor, I lost my ground. My second birth was amazing. There was so much of it that was similar to my first. But my support system was out of this world and with me the whole entire time. They left me when I wanted to retreat. They gathered around me when I felt that I didn’t have the strength to go on. I want every woman to experience this feeling of being so radiant and so warm and so powerful in the company of Wise Women.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

There are so many definitions of the word radical. The one that comes to mind quickly for most is going against the grain, following policies of extreme change, etc.

I prefer this one (from Merriam Webster): designed to remove the root of a disease or all diseased and potentially diseased tissue

The current medical system, in my frank opinion, is a diseased tissue. In order to change the face of maternal care in this country, we not only need to treat the effects, but remove the disease itself. Changing women’s views on their abilities and the abilities of their bodies is big for me. We are taught that are bodies are flawed (this is the effect of the medicalization of birth). If every birthing woman could have a doula and we could form the lost community of women who teach younger women, the trickle down effect of the medicalization of birth could be stopped. Then we could get to the diseased tissue which, in my opinion, is a combination of liability insurance costs and a lot of kiss arse policies that save practitioners while hurting women.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?

My philosophy is that your body knows that it is doing and that forming a community of women is an empowering way to come to an understanding of who you are. This fits into my broader views that interpersonal relationships have been completely destroyed and greed and corporations (*cough* pharma *cough*) are ruining us mind, body, and spirit.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?

It’s humbling and awe-inspiring. Being invited into one of the most intimate and personal times in a woman’s life is humbling on a level that I’ve never experienced.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?

That it be owned by the woman experiencing it. Not a doctor. Not a book. Not a company. By you. You are the owner of your body.