Radical Doula Profiles: Hannah Yore

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Hannah Yore: I offer full spectrum, sliding scale services that include prenatal, labor, and postpartum support as well as miscarriage and abortion counseling in the New York City area. I am committed to providing advocacy and companionship to pregnant people throughout a range of reproductive experiences and support my clients holistically. I am associated with DONA International and NYC’s Healthy Women, Healthy Futures Initiative. In addition to my work as a doula, I also have experience conducting international women’s health research, advocacy, and case management services. For more information, please email me at hannaheyore@gmail.com.

What inspired you to become a doula?
I have worked for five years with reproductive justice and sexual health organizations domestically and internationally as an advocate, case manager, and researcher. I also served as a promotora’s assistant in The Dominican Republic, providing holistic healthcare services to individuals in their homes. Many of the individuals I worked with expressed anxiety over navigating pregnancy, abortion, and family planning. I decided that being a doula provided me another opportunity to both expand my knowledge around natural medicine and better support women during emotional and monumental periods in their lives.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
Personally, identifying as a radical doula means acknowledging the ways in which current socio-economic systems negatively affect the reproductive experiences of queer folks, women of color, and those living in poverty. Having a radical doula practice requires that I take into account how my clients’ histories and intersecting identities influence their feelings around and experiences of reproductive choice and agency.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?
I believe doulas must take into account their clients’ mental and social realities rather than strictly the physical components of reproduction. My doula practice is an extension of my political beliefs and work as an organizer and activist around issues of social justice. As a feminist socialist organizer and international reproductive justice practitioner, I am committed to mitigating the harmful affects for-profit medical industries have on socially and economically marginalized communities.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
My favorite thing about being a doula is having the opportunity to learn from my clients. I have been fortunate to bear witness to extraordinary moments of strength, vulnerability, and resilience and each women with whom I work helps enrich my philosophy as a doula and expand my knowledge around healing, medicine, and human connection.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?
There are many issues surrounding pregnancy and birth, however, I would prioritize improving the relationship between individuals and their doctors. Unfortunately, pregnant folks are often left feeling confused and discouraged after medical appointments. I would like to see more culturally competent, individualized care models in hospital and OBGYN settings.

Advertisements

Radical Doula Profiles: Liz Trantanella

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Liz Trantanella: I am a full spectrum birth and postpartum doula in Louisville, Kentucky.

What inspired you to become a doula?
My first inspiration was my own doula who came to support me as a volunteer. I was 42 weeks at that point and she really helped me navigate my options and supported me physically and mentally until the birth of my son. Since becoming a mother and involved in the birth community, serving others is my passion.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
I support pregnant people on the spectrum of reproductive choices and experiences. This is very important to me as a person who has had an abortion, doula and activist. Live birth is not the only option or outcome for pregnant people. I found that it is extremely important to have conversation in community about the support that people need no matter the outcome in pregnancy.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?
I support pregnant people on the spectrum of reproductive choices and experiences.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
I love knowing that clients feel safe and empowered to make the decision that is best for them in pregnancy.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?
For it to be less stigmatized and medicalized experience.

Radical Doula Profiles: Lindsey Fisher

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Lindsey: Wife, mother of 3, & doula and ridiculously passionate about helping women find there inherent power that they were born with. Practicing in Joplin, MO.

What inspired you to become a doula?
After I had my first child, I fell in love with the process of pregnancy, and labor/delivery. Thankfully I was fortunate to experience birth in a different light as I had my second at home with a midwife that let me have choices and I thought I cannot believe I had my first child without being able to make any of these choices for myself. I hear stories of women everyday on forums and such about how they have been mistreated misguided and misunderstood by their providers and it angers me as a woman and I feel that as a doula I can help a woman by encouraging her to find her voice.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
I believe choices over one’s body is a right for everybody. I believe that just because you may be on Medicaid or other low-income scales that you still have a choice for your body and for the care that you receive. I feel like low-income women or impoverished women are still in fact women that need educated on the birth process, their choices, and their options and just because they may not be able to afford regular Doula services does not mean they don’t deserve Doula services.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
Making women aware of their power.

Radical Doula Profiles: Marleen Jett

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Marleen Jett: Hello there! My name is Marleen and I am a birth and postpartum doula serving the Los Angeles area. I trained with Doula Trainings International (DTI). I am also a member of the DTI social justice DTI committee which is a safe place where we try to think of ways to make the birth community more inclusive for all genders, races, classes, sexual orientations and bodies. I believe that birth is a natural process that can occur without medical interventions. Though medical interventions is sometimes needed, it’s my job to provide evidence based information so families can decided what is best for their birth.

What inspired you to become a doula?
Before I started my path as a doula I was a childcare provider. I cared for newborns, infants, toddlers and preteens. While working with new parents and their kids, my fascination with childbirth grew. On my free time you could easily find me reading or watching a documentary on birth. So I decided to become a doula.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
I believe in fighting for marginalize pregnant people to have a safe space in the birthing community. I want them to feel empowered, informed and in control of their own body and pregnancy.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?
I believe in total autonomy of the birthing person regardless of my personal views. I feel like if the birthing person doesn’t make their own decisions they will not feel empowered or satisfied with their birth story.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
Becoming a doula has filled my life with so much joy. I get to witness the most sacred time of someone’s life while giving emotional support. I believe in the true sense of Holistic care; which means considering the complete person physically and psychologically. I do this by educating families on plant based nutrition and the importance of self care.

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?
I hate how white woman centered the birthing community is. I have witness many leaders in birthing community be very publicly Transphobic. I also have been in birth community where I myself as a POC didn’t feel included or welcomed. I would love to see more spaces inclusive to all.

Radical Doula Profiles: Jessica Jimenez

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Jessica Jimenez: I am a queer-identified postpartum doula taking clients in the Los Angeles area. DONA trained in New York by Jackie Kelleher, the woman who literally wrote the book on postpartum doula support. I am a trained and certified educator with a degree in Art Education, which is an awesome background to have as a doula because I have tons of teaching tools paired with a creative practice. Born to help others, you will usually find me mentoring, training, and educating outside of working with clients. Website: www.losangelestribe.com

What inspired you to become a doula?
Why I became a doula is two parts. One part, because I loved working with families as an educator. However, as an educator, there was already so much history to each child and family before I met them. I wanted to be there at the beginning of a family to help them have an amazing start. The second part is because there are gaps in the care new families receive and I have seen, in my friends and family, how those gaps can negatively affect the development of parents and children. I am a born nurturer and I couldn’t think of a better way to spend my life than to fill those gaps of care to provide families with a lifeline at such a vulnerable time.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
I am a radical doula because I advocate for change. I stand up and educate when I see unfair treatment. I am a radical doula because I live to be the change I want to see in the world.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
The best thing about being a doula is serving my clients. Lifting their spirits, cheering them on, lightening their load, teaching them new skills, being a calm presence, hearing their stories, building their confidence. I am happy as a human when I can help others to thrive. I mean, what’s not to love about being a doula?

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?
I would change the blanket-style care in birth and postpartum. I would change the typical way people are treated in the same way no matter their personal preferences, fears, or identity. This method of care undermines parents and can strip them of their confidence to birth and parent the way they know they will be most successful. I want to see more personal, individualized care.

Radical Doula Profiles: Rachel Caballero

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Rachel: Rachel is a full spectrum doula, reproductive justice and healing warrior. She is based in Austin, TX. For the last 15 years she has supported parents as a doula, nanny, childcare giver and friend. As a childcare giver she founded La Semilla Childcare Collective a radical childcare collective for parents and children of color in Austin in 2008. She believes childcare and birthing on your own terms is a right. Presently she serves as the Birth Support Program Director for all women of color led Mama Sana Vibrant Woman where she coordinates the volunteer birth companion program prioritizing queer people of color and people of color to increase the number of birth workers of color who provide culturally respectful care. She is also currently a student midwife working towards her Certified Professional Midwife license.

What inspired you to become a doula?
The pregnancy and birth of one of my best friends. At the time I was spending alot of time with her, she is a single Black mama and her partner was incarcerated. The experience she had when our community stepped in to support her around her childbirth was life changing for me. Despite her obstacles she had a healthy happy birth and baby. It was through that experience that I realized despite our situations we could create the world we want to see. The act of providing emotional and physical support during pregnancy and childbirth was our tradition and a powerful role in community.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?

I identify with the term radical doula because for me it synthesizes my politics and my work. As a afrolatinxindigena woman it is important to talk about my work as a political act and form of solidarity. I am a doula because the medical institutions sterilize the communal and spiritual aspects out of birth and healthcare. We need life and spirit in these places as a part of being our whole selves. As a radical doula I play a vital role in challenging these institutions that perpetuate trauma and sickness.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?
Birth is physical, spiritual and sacred. People of color have always known this. I practice as a doula in order to reclaim, remember, and revitalize the spirit of our communities. I reclaim my role as a birth companion and healer, remember my traditional practices and knowledge, and revitalize myself and the people I work with in order to challenge white supremacy and trauma. As people of color who are experiencing genocide we have a right to care for ourselves exactly how we want and desire despite race/gender/sexuality. The white capitalist power structures were created and upheld to destroy our personal and collective Power. In order to liberate ourSelves we must reclaim our practices around birth and healing. We must remember the wisdom of our ancestors in order to survive and regain balance. Through this revitalize our spirits, selves, and communities.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
Working together and in solidarity with the birthing person! Working with their family/friends. The relationships and trust that are created during childbirth are lasting and authentic. And I love babies!

If you could change one thing about the experience of pregnancy and birth, what would it be?That every person despite situation or location has a doula, or support person at whatever point they choose.

Radical Doula Profiles: Andi Johnson

This is a series highlighting folks who identify as Radical Doulas. Are you interested in being part of the series? Go here to provide your responses to the profile questions and I’ll include you!

About Andi Johnson: I am a full-spectrum doula in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. I provide birth doula services, placenta encapsulation, loss support, abortion support, postpartum doula services, and birth pool rentals. I love writing, roller derby, and recently took up burlesque. I can be found at www.offbeatdoula.com and on various social media platforms under @offbeatdoula.

What inspired you to become a doula?
I became a doula after my own experiences with birthing. I realized that people giving birth need more support, more information, and a medium for their voices to be heard.

Why do you identify with the term radical doula?
The term radical doula has alway resonated with me. I am vocal about my inclusiveness and political beliefs surrounding birth. As a queer, polyamorous woman, I am sensitive and knowledgeable of the variety of identities and genders, and I do not discriminate. I am a pro-choice feminist and I believe that everyone should be their authentic selves without fear of judgement.

What is your doula philosophy and how does it fit into your broader political beliefs?
I believe that women should feel empowered, and that they deserve the information needed to make informed decisions. I believe that birthing women deserve the emotional and physical support they need to feel safe, comfortable, and trusted. My doula philosophy is based off of empowerment, security, trust, intuition, and choice.

This ties in to my political beliefs around women’s rights, reproductive justice, and equality. I will fight for women’s rights regarding their bodies and the marginalization they experience through everyday discrimination. I also will stand up for my LGBT family and believe we have a long way to go until we are equal. I am so very lucky to be in Canada, where same-sex marriage has been legal since 2005, and planned parenthood is not even a question.

What is your favorite thing about being a doula?
My favourite thing is seeing a family make choices confidently and using their voices. I love assisting women in letting go and trusting their bodies. I love helping women find empowerment.